mylifeinslut:

sktagg23:

sktagg23:

But let’s talk about Jamie Brewer.
She’s awesome.
Jamie Brewer made her television debut on American Horror Story. Prior to her transition to acting on camera she was a theatrical actress. She has not left the stage, however, and still continues her training through theater and through improvisation at 'The Groundlings Theatre and School' .
Being an individual with Down Syndrome Jamie has made it a point to be active in the Down Syndrome community. Jamie was the youngest to ever be elected President of the ARC of Fort Bend Chapter. From there, she was appointed to the State of Texas ARC Board, then elected to the Executive Board as Treasurer. Jamie was then asked to serve on the ARC Governmental Affairs Committee for the State of Texas. She spoke with Senators at the Texas State Capitol to persuade them to pass the law for Texas to abolish using the “R” word from state legislation, and regarding the needs of people with disabilities in Texas. Texas now uses “Intellectual Developmental Disability” in their legislation. 1
Brewer is involved with a several non-profit organizations, including DSALA, DSiAM, BTAP, National Down Syndrome Congress, American Association of People with Disabilities of the United States, and Civitan International.

QUEEN.

The True Supreme, IMHO

mylifeinslut:

sktagg23:

sktagg23:

But let’s talk about Jamie Brewer.

She’s awesome.

Jamie Brewer made her television debut on American Horror Story. Prior to her transition to acting on camera she was a theatrical actress. She has not left the stage, however, and still continues her training through theater and through improvisation at 'The Groundlings Theatre and School' .

Being an individual with Down Syndrome Jamie has made it a point to be active in the Down Syndrome community. Jamie was the youngest to ever be elected President of the ARC of Fort Bend Chapter. From there, she was appointed to the State of Texas ARC Board, then elected to the Executive Board as Treasurer. Jamie was then asked to serve on the ARC Governmental Affairs Committee for the State of Texas. She spoke with Senators at the Texas State Capitol to persuade them to pass the law for Texas to abolish using the “R” word from state legislation, and regarding the needs of people with disabilities in Texas. Texas now uses “Intellectual Developmental Disability” in their legislation. 1

Brewer is involved with a several non-profit organizations, including DSALA, DSiAM, BTAP, National Down Syndrome Congress, American Association of People with Disabilities of the United States, and Civitan International.

QUEEN.

The True Supreme, IMHO

(via spoopyteatime)

(Source: maslanybrochus, via lauronicamars)

"They’ll make a lot more sense in the later episodes.."

hotladypants about the (rather ominous) lyrics to ‘Love Will Have Its Sacrifices’ by Soles

and can I just say I am NOT in ANY SENSE ready for these upcoming episodes and I might die.

(via lovewillbecruel)

Fasten your seatbelts cause heart hurt is coming

(via hotladypants)

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: what
(x)

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: what

(x)

(via anamatics)

wavesheep:

dads(and uncle’s) sleeping posture :D

(via bonbori)

"

Pointing out Marvel Studios’ lack of on-screen diversity is nowhere near a new phenomenon. As ComicsAlliance’s Andrew Wheeler has memorably pointed out, “If Marvel makes Thor 3 [as its first 2017 release], it will have made ten movies headlined by blond white men named Chris before it makes one movie headlined by someone who isn’t even white.” While not besmirching the talent or integrity of Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth and Chris Pratt, that’s taking lack of diversity to admirably comic levels.

Additionally, the studio’s lack of a movie with a female lead — specifically, a Black Widow feature starring Scarlett Johansson, although fans would also accept a Captain Marvel movie, or even a Squirrel Girl one by this point — has been commented on to such an extent that Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige recently weighed in, saying that he “very much believe[s] in doing it” in concept. “I hope we do it sooner rather than later,” he added at the time, while simultaneously pointing out that Marvel’s ongoing successful franchises make finding slots for new characters and concepts challenging.

That is somewhat of a smokescreen, in terms of excuses. As this summer’s Guardians of the Galaxy shows, Marvel has no problem introducing new characters and concepts — in fact, we’re due to have one per year for the next couple of years, with Ant-Man coming next year and Doctor Strange landing in 2016. In both of those cases, however, Marvel is sticking closely to white male leads. (Admittedly, the lead role in Doctor Strange is not cast, and it’s not impossible that Marvel will choose to break with tradition and cast a non-white male as its Sorcerer Supreme — but, given some of the actors rumored to have been considered for the role, that doesn’t look likely.)

Of course, there’s still an obvious opportunity for Marvel to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat on the subject of diversity in casting. Both Wonder Woman and Sony’s mystery Spider-Man project are scheduled (in the latter case, rumored) for 2017 release, and Marvel has an unnamed project scheduled for release May 5 of that year — almost two months before the June 23 bow for Wonder Woman. What if it snuck in a female-led movie just under the wire in order to be “first”?

Similarly, Aquaman isn’t due until July 2018, and there are three unknown Marvel projects scheduled before then. Black Panther, Falcon or even an upgrade from Netflix to theaters for Luke Cage could help Marvel become the first studio to put a superhero of color on the big screen since 2008’s Hancock — if it wanted to.

That, ultimately, is what this comes down to: what Marvel wants to do. As arguably the most successful movie studio around these days, and one that has demonstrated no problem in convincing mainstream audiences to accept a dancing tree and a talking raccoon as heroes, it’s not a question of whether Marvel could make a movie with a woman or person of color in the lead role, or even could make such a movie a hit. It’s a question of whether that’s something that the studio is interested in doing. Whenever Marvel announces its next projects — something which may be sooner than later, given this week’s Warner Bros. schedule announcement — we’ll get the answer to that question.

"

The Hollywood Reporter, “Warner Bros. and DC Expose Marvel’s Achilles Heel: Diversity

(via fyeahlilbit3point0)

(via majesdanes)

sixpenceee:

A "vampire grave" in Bulgaria holds a skeleton with a stake through its heart. It’s a skeleton from the 13th century. The remains once belonged to a man who was likely in his 40s. An iron rod had been hammered through his chest to keep the corpse from rising from the dead and disturbing the living. His left leg had also been removed and placed beside the corpse
At the time of the man’s death, vampires were perceived as a real threat in many Eastern European communities. People who died unusually—from suicide, for example—were sometimes staked to prevent them from coming back from the dead. (Source) (You may also like: Frankenstein Mummies) 

sixpenceee:

A "vampire grave" in Bulgaria holds a skeleton with a stake through its heart. It’s a skeleton from the 13th century. The remains once belonged to a man who was likely in his 40s. An iron rod had been hammered through his chest to keep the corpse from rising from the dead and disturbing the living. His left leg had also been removed and placed beside the corpse

At the time of the man’s death, vampires were perceived as a real threat in many Eastern European communities. People who died unusually—from suicide, for example—were sometimes staked to prevent them from coming back from the dead. (Source) (You may also like: Frankenstein Mummies

(via anamatics)

– I Will Wait (63,788 plays)

jenimation:

so The Book of Life has a Mexican mariachi version of “I Will Wait” by fucking Mumford and Sons

this movie is a cinematic masterpiece

(via batcii)

starbuckers:

I wish my name was brad so that I would be 75% rad

(via space-geisha)

olanrogers:

theladylondon:

Okay, folks. It’s time we had a rather serious talk about olanrogers. Settle in friends, this might be a lengthy one. So, many moons ago (well, okay, only two years technically) I was having some trouble sleeping one night. It was about 4:00am and, knowing better, I decided to listen to some music. Phil Collins, to be exact. And I know what you’re thinking - “How in the world does casually night bopping along to ‘Easy Lover’ ever intersect with Olan Rogers?” Well, I’m here to tell you. Not having his sweet jams on my Itunes at the time (I KNOW), I was listening to Phil serenade me via Youtube. One way or another (and I honest to goodness could not, for the life of me, tell you how this happened), I came across a video simply titled ‘GHOST IN THE STALLS’. Curiosity got the better of me, and I clicked. Let me tell you, the love, it was instant. Who was this magical story weaver who laughed heartily at his own jokes?! His giggle hooked me right then and there, and I watched every video of his I could. I laughed so loud and so hard that I woke up my poor roommate. Like, there was tears and wheezing involved here. I was afraid my breathing would never return to normal. Thankfully, it did and I finally fell asleep feeling so happy from the stories shared with me by this wondrous little internet fellow. Fast forward to 2014 and this dude still keeps me in hysterics. That’s a pretty neat thing to be able to do, don’t you think? So, of course, when my dear friend Fehryn told me that he was coming to Toronto for Buffer Festival, the decision to attend his screening was a no-brainer. Today was that big moment, and it couldn’t have happened to a cooler person. The screening itself was wonderful. Loads of strangers in a room giggling with one another is not a bad way to spend a Sunday afternoon. All of the videos Olan chose to share were so great. What I really like about Olan is that his comedy is SO funny but never mean or at the expense of someone else, which I love. I think that’s a pretty rare thing to come across these days. Of course, there were some pretty emotional moments too. Olan crying during a portion of his documentary was hard to watch. But seeing someone so moved by the genuine strength of their relationships with people was so heart warming. Then he went on to speak about following your dreams, and I think everyone in that room felt a little bit brighter and more inspired because of him. After the screening was the meetup portion. There was well over a hundred people waiting, but he took his time with everyone. One thing that really struck me was how he greeted every single person with a hug. That simple little gesture said volumes about what kind of a person he is. We were towards the end, and watching him interact was such a neat thing to see. His joyousness is hard to describe, but he was so genuinely kind, warm, inviting, and friendly that it could be felt. Want a silly picture? Not a problem. Want to talk to him for a few minutes? He was totally engaged. At one point, one of the volunteers taking photos dropped a girl’s phone and it broke. Olan, without hesitation, offered to buy her a new one. If that doesn’t tell you what a truly exceptional human this guy is, I don’t know what will.You may think, “Whoa there Britt, he’s just a dude that makes Youtube videos, simmer down”. But the point I’m trying to emphasize here is that people who are genuinely positive influences in this world are hard to find. Olan is, at the end of the day, a truly good and nice person. Yes, his platform may “just” be Youtube videos, but he is important for the message that he sends simply by being himself - you can achieve your dreams while still being exactly the goofy, ridiculous, caring, hilarious, giggle machine that you are.

<3

olanrogers:

theladylondon:

Okay, folks. It’s time we had a rather serious talk about olanrogers. Settle in friends, this might be a lengthy one.

So, many moons ago (well, okay, only two years technically) I was having some trouble sleeping one night. It was about 4:00am and, knowing better, I decided to listen to some music. Phil Collins, to be exact. And I know what you’re thinking - “How in the world does casually night bopping along to ‘Easy Lover’ ever intersect with Olan Rogers?” Well, I’m here to tell you. Not having his sweet jams on my Itunes at the time (I KNOW), I was listening to Phil serenade me via Youtube. One way or another (and I honest to goodness could not, for the life of me, tell you how this happened), I came across a video simply titled ‘GHOST IN THE STALLS’. Curiosity got the better of me, and I clicked. Let me tell you, the love, it was instant. Who was this magical story weaver who laughed heartily at his own jokes?! His giggle hooked me right then and there, and I watched every video of his I could. I laughed so loud and so hard that I woke up my poor roommate. Like, there was tears and wheezing involved here. I was afraid my breathing would never return to normal. Thankfully, it did and I finally fell asleep feeling so happy from the stories shared with me by this wondrous little internet fellow.

Fast forward to 2014 and this dude still keeps me in hysterics. That’s a pretty neat thing to be able to do, don’t you think? So, of course, when my dear friend Fehryn told me that he was coming to Toronto for Buffer Festival, the decision to attend his screening was a no-brainer. Today was that big moment, and it couldn’t have happened to a cooler person.

The screening itself was wonderful. Loads of strangers in a room giggling with one another is not a bad way to spend a Sunday afternoon. All of the videos Olan chose to share were so great. What I really like about Olan is that his comedy is SO funny but never mean or at the expense of someone else, which I love. I think that’s a pretty rare thing to come across these days. Of course, there were some pretty emotional moments too. Olan crying during a portion of his documentary was hard to watch. But seeing someone so moved by the genuine strength of their relationships with people was so heart warming. Then he went on to speak about following your dreams, and I think everyone in that room felt a little bit brighter and more inspired because of him.

After the screening was the meetup portion. There was well over a hundred people waiting, but he took his time with everyone. One thing that really struck me was how he greeted every single person with a hug. That simple little gesture said volumes about what kind of a person he is. We were towards the end, and watching him interact was such a neat thing to see. His joyousness is hard to describe, but he was so genuinely kind, warm, inviting, and friendly that it could be felt. Want a silly picture? Not a problem. Want to talk to him for a few minutes? He was totally engaged. At one point, one of the volunteers taking photos dropped a girl’s phone and it broke. Olan, without hesitation, offered to buy her a new one. If that doesn’t tell you what a truly exceptional human this guy is, I don’t know what will.

You may think, “Whoa there Britt, he’s just a dude that makes Youtube videos, simmer down”. But the point I’m trying to emphasize here is that people who are genuinely positive influences in this world are hard to find. Olan is, at the end of the day, a truly good and nice person. Yes, his platform may “just” be Youtube videos, but he is important for the message that he sends simply by being himself - you can achieve your dreams while still being exactly the goofy, ridiculous, caring, hilarious, giggle machine that you are.

<3